Tag Archives: Rick Warren

Love the Porcupines…Quills and All

the parts of the body that seem to be weaker are indispensable, and on those parts of the body that we think less honorable we bestow the greater honor, and our unpresentable parts are treated with greater modesty, which our more presentable parts do not require. But God has so composed the body, giving greater honor to the part that lacked it, that there may be no division in the body, but that the members may have the same care for one another. 1 Corinthians 12:22-25

porcupine quillsI’ve learned to be careful in my application of Paul’s “body parts” metaphor in 1 Corinthians 12 and Romans 12. Once you start assigning body-part descriptions to individuals in your church, the discussion can all go south pretty quickly. The truth is, most of us would rather not know what body part many in our church would use to describe us!

I am thinking today about the “difficult” people in the church, the “porcupines” (painful to love), the ones Rick Warren describes so eloquently as the EGR people (Extra Grace Required). Paul would describe them as “seeming to be weaker” or ones “we think less honorable” or “unpresentable parts”. These are the people we generally would prefer not to be around, the ones we wish would try visiting another small group rather than ours (except that we would not wish that on any of the other leaders). These are the extremely high-maintenance folks with negative outlooks on everything and everyone. They are “projects”, needing lots and lots of attention. They are exhausting.

As I consider this category of fellow believers, my first thought is to question whether or not I am perceived as one. I think it is worth our while as leaders to examine the evidence of how influential we really are …

There’s a Word for It: Gossip

But when Cephas came to Antioch, I opposed him to his face, because he stood condemned…But when I saw that their conduct was not in step with the truth of the gospel, I said to Cephas before them all… Galatians 2:11,14

gossipSeems there is a lot of disagreement among Christians these days. Have you noticed? There are probably a lot of reasons for it…emotional, political, even spiritual. But, for our purposes here today, those reasons are not what matters. Those are for another post on another day. I want to talk here about how we manage that disagreement, especially in this day of social media. When a Christian leader does something or says something that we disagree with, how do we handle that? What should be our priorities?

From Rick Warren to Rob Bell to John Piper to Mark Driscoll to Tony Campolo to Franklin Graham, we are in a season (dare I say, an era?) of Christian thought leaders who do or say something with which you or I may disagree. Strongly. And when that happens, the world (represented first and foremost by the media) sits back and observes how we handle that disagreement. And then they (the media) report what they see and hear in our responses to one another. Given how our very testimony to a watching world hangs on how we handle these relationships and these responses (which, by the way, is precisely why Jesus prayed for our “oneness” in John 17…”so that the world might know…”) it seems to me we must be extremely prayerful and careful to use a process which honors the Lord, i.e., a process endorsed by scripture.

In the early church, Peter (aka Cephas) behaved wrongly, showing some racial prejudice on his part. Paul found it necessary to confront that wrong …

The Shrewd Servant Church

But his master answered him, ‘You wicked and slothful servant! You knew that I reap where I have not sown and gather where I scattered no seed? Then you ought to have invested my money with the bankers, and at my coming I should have received what was my own with interest. Matthew 25:26-27

Honestly, I have always felt a little sorry for the poor servant who did not invest his master’s money wisely. It seems to me there is at least a little wisdom in putting the money away and making sure it doesn’t get lost or otherwise wasted away. I can still remember the first time I ever studied this parable (I was a teenager) and being shocked at the harshness of this master. “Wicked” and “slothful” just seemed a little over the top to me, especially for a servant who kept all of his master’s money intact and did not lose any of it.

human resourcesBut, alas, the economy of God’s kingdom does not favor the radical fiscal conservatives like me. In God’s eyes, simply hiding the resources under my mattress and saving them for a rainy day is just poor stewardship. I should rather be investing those resources and growing them. I should be risking them a little (every investment is a risk) and putting them to work.

The same is true for the church. And not just with finances or material resources, but maybe even more importantly, with the human resources God has given us in our congregants…the spiritual gifts, talents, abilities, learned skills, work backgrounds, and emotional strengths in the people God has brought us. Our master has placed all those resources into our hands as the church and, shrewd stewards that we are, we are to put them to work…risk them…use them to produce …