Tag Archives: Ephesians 2

Our Foolish Fragile Fences

But now in Christ Jesus you who once were far off have been brought near by the blood of Christ. For he himself is our peace, who has made us both one and has broken down in his flesh the dividing wall of hostility. Ephesians 2:13-14

dividing fence

We all build fences. It is an essential part of the human condition. We categorize and re-categorize ourselves and others over and over again in order to protect our fragile egos and in order to minimize any complex thinking required to really see others. We are quick to identify differences which separate us and we “otherize” anyone we do not agree with or do not fully understand. We build fences. And we do this within the church.

Apparently, the single most effective tool for breaking down fences between people or groups of people is to identify a bigger, more important dividing line. Having found that more significant division, most of the smaller ones suddenly seem less important and may dissolve altogether. You have experienced this.

Take, for example, the deep, deep political divide the United States was experiencing after the 2000 Presidential election…the race between Al Gore and George W. Bush. Does the term “hanging chad” ring a bell? Remember how very deeply this country was split right down the middle? We had almost a full year of political fights over those election results. But then, on September 11 of the following year, the greatest catastrophe this country has ever known was inflicted upon us. Suddenly, those deep, deep dividing lines seemed unimportant, because now there was a much bigger, more important dividing line…one that ran between this country and its terrorist foes. This country has never been more “unified” than in the days and weeks immediately following that event. Democrats and Republicans became …

God is Not Fair

But God, being rich in mercy, because of the great love with which he loved us, even when we were dead in our trespasses, made us alive together with Christ—by grace you have been saved— and raised us up with him and seated us with him in the heavenly places in Christ Jesus… Ephesians 2:4-6

gavelGod is not dead. It’s a message that is kind of going around recently. It’s a terrific message, too…one the world needs to hear…one the church needs to send. For a lost and broken world, for a world in need of a savior, it is very, very good news…UNLESS, he is also fair. You see, if God is very much alive and is also very much about fairness, then you and I (and everyone else) are very much doomed.

When scripture says, “…even when we were dead in our trespasses…” that is what it means: doomed. It means that you and I (and everyone else) have made choice after choice after choice to please ourselves with little or no regard to God. It means we have opted for short-term prizes with enormous long-term (eternal) consequences. It means we have chosen to live without God and that is exactly what we deserve…an eternity without God. “Fairness”, then, would only mean one thing: getting what we deserve. It would mean our utter and complete destruction. That would be “fair”. That’s what we each have earned, according to our creator’s standards.

We don’t like to think of ourselves that way, of course. We look at our poor choices and bad behavior and then we immediately look for justification for it. We look to blame others for it. We look to compare ourselves to others and, finding someone who is “worse” than we are, we can take some solace …

The Barrier-free Church

Tuesday Re-mix – This is a popular post from last year, updated and resubmitted for your consideration and comments.

For he himself is our peace, who has made the two one and has destroyed the barrier, the dividing wall of hostility…” Ephesians 2:14

Bob Deffinbaugh, a favorite Bible commentator of mine over at Bible.org, has a wonderful illustration for the cultural barriers which still existed in the New Testament church between the Jewish Christians and the gentile Christians. In this article, Deffinbaugh compares the Jewish response to the gentile influx into the church with Jacob’s response when he woke up to find that the marriage he had consummated was not to Rachel, but was to Leah, her sister. For Jacob, it was surely a “WHAT”S GOING ON!?” moment. Similarly, it had to have been a complete shock to the system of the traditional Jewish person that the very people God had told them not to intermarry with were now receiving a carte blanche invitation into God’s family. In short, the cultural barriers which existed between Jews and gentiles were enormous, but nonetheless came crumbling down in the name of Jesus.

Building barriers is nothing new to the human condition. We are, by nature, a “tribal” kind of being. I have a tribe, you have a tribe. We build barriers because it makes us feel safe or perhaps because it gives us an identity. My “tribe” may be my country, my family, my political persuasion, my vocation, my neighborhood, my church, etc. We retreat into our “tribe’s” boundaries and then erect barriers to protect us against unwanted elements.

But Jesus changed that. You have probably heard it said, “the ground at the foot of the cross is level.” In other words, none of our tribes will get us …

Your Church: God’s Workmanship or Man’s

Tuesday Re-mix – This is a popular post from last year, updated and resubmitted for your consideration and comments.

For we are God’s workmanship, created in Christ Jesus to do good works, which God prepared in advance for us to do. Ephesians 2:10

There is something truly magical about the relationship between an artist and his/her art.  Art reflects the artist, it shares attributes with its creator.  It tells the observer something about the artist.

Being “God’s workmanship” as Paul describes for us in these comments means we are necessarily a reflection of Him.  We share some beautiful attributes as a result: our appearing as holy and blameless before Him through Christ, our being alive in Christ (when we were dead in transgressions), being seated with Christ in the heavenly realms, and of course the whole salvation thing are all wonderful ramifications of being God’s workmanship. An artist’s work is always a reflection of the artist.

Being God’s artwork means the whole world can look at our lives and see God’s hand.  They can see things about us that are clearly and unmistakeably the work of something larger than any human hand.  “God raised us up with Christ…in order that in the coming ages He might show the incomparable riches of His grace, expressed in His kindness to us in Christ Jesus.” Like every masterful work of art, our role is to point back to the artist and to represent characteristics shared and known well by the artist.

This is true of us individually and it is true of the church corporate.  Christ is the only Head of the church, and nothing the church attempts to do on its own (without the involvement of the Spirit) has any meaning at all.  There should be nothing at all about Christ’s church …